Future food shortage crisis

WorldFoodCrisisFig05

It really is real. It’s one of those problems those of us who live in third world countries find it easy to ignore. We also find it very easy and convenient to keep having babies. We’re like the domestic cat, populating like bunnies, unwanted children dying in streets or in “shelters”, and spreading disease.

Start sterilizing.

I’m serious. The people who say “but it’s our natural right to have babies” are the first to go. Get that ignorant shit out of the human genome and fast.

Making more food isn’t the answer. We are destroying ecosystems and the stability of thousands of species too quickly, giving them no time to adapt and survive.

Why is snipping people in the testes/Fallopian tubes not being talked about?

Someone with more ethics than me: Penny for your Thought?

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7 thoughts on “Future food shortage crisis

  1. I am an American and will reflect the opinions of what we should do in a developed nation. I have no idea what to do in a third world country aside from making birth control more accessible, as well as sex education, and enforcing more punishment for rapists. Easier said than done, but probably still easier than mass sterilization.

    Anyway, I’m childfree and would pay a lot of money to be sterilized. I think we should first start with allowing childfree people to be sterilized without having to hear ten years of “you’ll change your mind” crap by five different doctors. Seriously. If you’re a woman, you practically have to put a gun to a doctor’s head to get your tubes tied.

    If it could be offered as a free voluntary “public service”, like organ donation, I think some people would also take you up on that offer after having one or two children. Birth control sucks, after all. But I’m still too ethical to force sterilization on someone who doesn’t want it, and China’s one-child law has some pretty bad side effects. I just don’t think it would really solve anything. As far as my country goes, ditching the pronatalist culture that puts parents on a pedestal, and gives them tax benefits for procreating, might be a start though.

    • I agree with you. I’ve met many women who never want children. I don’t understand why sterilization is so hard to get.

      Good thoughts! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Unlike many, if not most, animals, we have the ability to understand our impact on our surrounding environment. Here’s hoping more of humanity gets a clue in this department!

    I think there are more and more people choosing not to have children though, and that is refreshing to see.

    • Ability, but too many are ignorant. More than that believe that their god will restore the earth eventually. One can hope, but it’s not looking likely.

      I have seen more and more people not wanting children as well. But what’s worse to see, for me, is that they’re intelligent. Whereas I continue to see ignorance pieces of shit multiplying like bunnies.

      • You do have a point. Maybe the extra free time of not having kids will allow the intelligent to share such insights with those who don’t seem to get it?

        Yeah, the whole restore the Earth stuff really seems to get in the way of respecting all the greater forces acting upon us – the things that should be connected with the idea of God.

  3. It’s controversial whether the world population will rise exponentially or it has plateaued especially in developed countries where the birth rates are dropping. For example, last I checked in Japan the birth rate is lower than the death rate. Even if the world population is bubbling up, the world has way more arable land and could easily feed a much much larger population. And, if arable land is stressed, we could start food distribution programs. America for example wastes tons of food. We are obese and throw out so much food when undeveloped nations barely get by and have malnutrition problems.

    So, really overpopulation and its effects are highly controversial. If malnutrition is what concerns you, this is already a huge problem in undeveloped countries as I said. Access to and awareness of modern birth control might be a terrible intervention because no woman would be on board with this. There are good reasons to have as many children as possible in an undeveloped country. The biggest is probably because this gives families a some sort of social safety net where welfare, Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and so on are nonexistent. But, having as many children as possible might end up contributing to malnutrition because there are more mouths to feed.

    So, the real key here is getting undeveloped nations more developed which is more difficult than bandaids of population control or foreign aid to corrupt governments. I think one of the keys is simply educating children. They are the key to the future of their nation, improving their economies and trading with richer nations to bring in wealth, and creating social safety networks. But, educating people in third world setting comes with the problem of “brain drain” where they tend to leave their native country and move to first world countries where opportunity, wealth, and safety abound. Regardless, in theory, broad improvements in education should help transform undeveloped nations and ultimately stave off malnutrition.

    • Another commented elsewhere in like fashion. It is a multi-faceted issue, the one you raised being one of them. We waste far too much, eat too much, and just don’t go about it smartly in general.

      Good thoughts.

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